The parodist could not rely on First Amendment protection because it used the famous sneakers as a source identifier. The maker of a sneaker that parodied a famous brand of skateboard-friendly kicks was not entitled to First Amendment protection against a claim of trademark infringement because it used the trade dress of the original as…

The murals were merely hidden from public view, not modified or destroyed. A law school that covered up two controversial murals with acoustic panels in order to hide them from public view did not violate the rights of the visual artist who created the murals, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit has…

A long legal battle over the status of “the greatest of all cheeses,” comes to an apparent end. A federal court in Virginia correctly relied on standards of identity written by the Food and Drug Administration to conclude that the word GRUYERE was not entitled to geographical trademark protection, the U.S. Court of Appeals for…

A district court was too hasty in rejecting the safe distance rule. A federal district court in Detroit must reconsider its decision to allow the Indian maker of an off-road vehicle to release a redesigned product that ostensibly did not infringe the trade dress of the venerable Jeep brand, the U.S. Court of Appeals for…

Pepsi earns reversal of pretrial order that would have required it to stop marketing a new Mountain Dew product. A federal district court was wrong to enjoin Pepsi from continuing to market a canned energy drink under the Mountain Dew line under the name of “rise energy” because the owner of the RISE mark was…

Traditional limitations on trademarking a personal name give way to free speech interests when it comes to prominent public officials. The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board violated the First Amendment rights of a trademark applicant when it denied registration to his t-shirt that disparaged former President Trump, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal…

A district court rightly enjoined a Wyoming trial lawyer training program from purporting to be the “true board” of a competing program from which it had recently split, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit has held. But the court of appeals, while upholding the injunction against the splinter academy, found that the…

Although the federal court stayed its action to allow a state court to determine the scope of certain licenses, the stay could not be reviewed on appeal because it did not effectively end the federal court litigation. A federal court’s decision to temporarily stay a trademark lawsuit in order to allow a state court to…

Substantial evidence supported the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board’s finding that another company, and not the trademark holder, actually used the mark in commerce. The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board (TTAB) correctly determined that a Korean biopharmaceutical company did not use in commerce the mark for a nutritional product that purportedly improves brain performance, the…